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Jonas Kehrbaum

Jonas Kehrbaum

Self-exploration and higher education are not mutually exclusive

Choosing your college major after high school can be one of the most life-altering decisions you ever make. Many students fear this decision. In the end, it does not simply influence your job and your salary, but more importantly the circle of people you will be surrounded by, how fulfilled your work-life will be, and maybe even where you will end up living. Unlike the U.S., most higher educational systems make it pretty hard to 1. get in a specific degree program and 2. change your program when you realize that it is not for you.
Choosing your college major after high school can be one of the most life-altering decisions you ever make. Many students fear this decision. In the end, it does not simply influence your job and your salary, but more importantly the circle of people you will be surrounded by, how fulfilled your work-life will be, and maybe even where you will end up living. Unlike the U.S., most higher educational systems make it pretty hard to
1. get in a specific degree program and
2. change your program when you realize that it is not for you.

I don’t believe that changing a college major a couple of times should be a timely, societal, or even a financial burden. It is rather the most important learning experience we can make as young adults.  I believe that right that we have a right for self-exploration, which is why we at Epro are so passionate about sending international students to the U.S. The U.S. still offers one of the most flexible and adaptable higher education systems in the world. See the video below where 
Eric Weinhold, the Associate Director of International Admission at Ithaca College in New York, tells us about what makes U.S. Higher Education unique – its flexibility.
 

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